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A Transgender Day of Remembrance

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012 | Posted by | 10 responses

Two days before Thanksgiving, a day of feasting, coming together and general appreciation, a

Charity C. Hart

day of acceptance, good will and good football,   Guerneville will respectfully be  paying homage to a widely misunderstood slice of humanity.
The “T” in LGBT, represents a state of gender identity, which since 1965 has been labeled “transgender”, and for the most part (as Rodney Dangerfield would put it), they “don’t get no respect.”
Coined by Columbia University psychiatrist John F. Oliven, the general term applies to people, behaviors and groups whose lifestyles tend to vary from culturally conventional gender roles and as a result have been stigmatized, ostracized and otherwise mistreated for their desire to be themselves.

And so Tuesday, November 20 has been dubbed a Transgender Day of Remembrance, a day on which to memorialize those who have been killed as a result of transphobia.
The event, organized by Novice Sister Lucille “Has” Balls (Charity C. Hart) of the Russian River Sisters,  is being convened to remember those who have lost their lives due to the ignorance and scorn of a society which too  often doesn’t understand how difficult it is to be counted as a member of  the transgender community.
Says Novice Sister Lucille Has Balls, “transgendered people should have the opportunity to

Transgender Pride Flag

live life to the fullest without hate (transphobia) or judgment, and this remembrance is for those who have perished by their own hand or through the violence of others.”
The event will get rolling at Guerneville’s Sonoma Nesting Company at 6 p.m. with a performance by Cazadero resident Gwen “Sugar Mama” Avery, recognized as one of the finest blues artists west of the Volga, followed by  Novice Sister Lucille who will share her real-life experiences as a transgender person, and a remembrance of Sister Mariposa Flutterby of the Russian River Sisters.
As people arrive, they will be handed candles and slips of paper on which they may write the names of those who lost their lives during the previous year.

Among the speakers will be Grace De La Torre, who will talk about what it’s like to be the parent of a transgender youth. and Kristin Lyseggen, Norwegian author and photographer,

Kris Lyseggen

who will have several of her photos on display, and will read from her upcoming book, The Boy Who Wasn’t a Lesbian.
With lit candles, the attendees will walk to the R3 Hotel on Fourth and Mill Streets where Sister Sara Femme Fatale will perform a blessing and the transgender flag will be raised followed by  poetry  read by Jasmine De la Torre.

After the reading,  participants are invited to Whitetail Winebar, 16230 Main Street, where photographer Chloe Meynier will be on hand to discuss her photographic works (on display through November 30) which deal with gender identity issues.
Although all the events are free, those who wish to donate to Transgender North Bay may do so.
For more information about Transgender Day of Remembrance, visit the Russian River Sisters’ website: www.rrsisters.org or contact Novice Sister Lucille via: info@rrsisters.org

10 Comments for “A Transgender Day of Remembrance”

  1. Thanks Stephen! Novice Sister Lucille has worked tirelessly on this event.

  2. Thank you. It sound like it will be memorable in more ways than one, and very beautiful as well.

  3. Sounds like a super event- and just another reason this area of Sonoma county is so fantastic. Diversity, difference and similarity are what join us all.

  4. Bravo Stephen.. You are a vital part of the community! Our messenger! Thank you for all you do!

    • You’re too kind. Thanks so much for your encouragement ans support. Because of folks like you we all live among people who are generous, thoughtful and embrace diversity instead of just tolerating it. We’ve grown in ways that are commendable and gained more respect because people are taking more pride in being a part of what’s been happening here. Thanks for the example you’ve set.

  5. I wish there was more kindness and acceptance in the world so that we did not have to have a day like this -

  6. wonderful!!! Thank you for sharing this with us all…

  7. You’re very welcome. We’re lucky to have good-hearted, compassionate and generous people in this area, and I’m fortunate to be part of such a selfless community.

  8. Thank you Stephen Gross for your very kind words and interest in this event. I feel very blessed to know you and to have you write a wonderful piece for The TDoR event.

    • Thanks for the kind remarks, but you’re the one who spent hours and hours organizing the event and making sure it all came together. You put a lot of time and energy into it and the entire community thanks you.
      Writing about it was no big deal compared to what you accomplished.

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Stephen Gross, The River correspondent

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